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Chemistry: Element Project

The Assignment

Review the assignment sheet given out by the professor. All the information about the element can be found from different books, websites, or articles. Many resources will need to be examined in order to complete the required presentation.

The Chemical Writing tab provides more information about creating a poster or presentation.

Find the Word Origin

First find out what the origin of the assigned element's name. Some elements have names based on ancient Greek or Latin words. Examples include gold (Au) or lead (Pb).

Example: Element 69 - Thulium - Refer to the three definitions listed below.

These paragraphs summarize the information:

This element derives from two combined words: , " < Thule n. -ium suffix"  It was first used in 1879 by P.T. Cleve in the Chemical News journal.

Thule comes from the Latin and ancient Greek. It is a country six days (by a boat voyage) north of present-day England, probably present-day Scacndinavia, Polypius wrote about Thule in his books, The Histories in the mid-100s B.C.

"ium" signifies a Latin word to designate metals.

In the reference list, all three OED entries must be listed.

Books in the Reference Section

These books are located in the 2nd floor, near the Reference Desk. These books must stay in the library. However, pages can be scanned. Some of the physical properties answers of the assignment can be found in these books.

Specific Books about Elements

These books are located in the 2nd floor, near the Reference Desk. These books must stay in the library. However, pages can be scanned. 

The covers show which elements are discussed.

Reliable On-Line Information

1. This interactive Periodic Table Live was produced by several federal grants. Click on the element to retrieve details. 

2. The United States Government maintains several databases to inform the public about elements, molecules, and compounds. Data and images can be used for the project from Toxnet. 

The most useful databases are: HSDB, ChemIDplus, TOXMAP, Household Products Database, Haz-Map, and IRIS.

Click on the name of the element, not the name of the database, to retrieve the information.

 

Print Books in at Circulation Reserve Desk

These books are available at the Circulation Desk. They are on RESERVE; the books can't leave the library. Bring the P2 card to check out the book. There is a time limitation to review the book.

Scanning images or text is permitted.